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Residents are Staying Local, and So Should Your Marketing

by Courtney Soinski

Do you see yourself as the type of person who moves around a lot? Or, are you still living in the same state where you were born and raised? The truth is, most people living in the United States have remained in their local area, according to Census microdata obtained from ipums.org at the University of Minnesota Population Center.

Take a look at the map below. This shows the percentage of the population in each state who have kept their home local. Each shape represents where the people living in a state were born.

Screenshot 2015-03-26 11.27.02

nytimes.com

Read more – Mapping Migration in the United States

In Louisiana, for example, 79% of the population still lives there. That means nearly 4 out of 5 residents were born in the state, which has stayed consistent over the past decade.

See how your state ranks.

When residents are THIS local, your marketing should be local, too. Once you’ve defined the geographic profile of your target audience, you can use this information both offline and online by placing advertising on the real streets of those locations. That may mean a billboard, a direct mail campaign, or a locally distributed real estate magazine, like The Real Estate Book®.


Want to learn more? Contact your local Real Estate Book representative today. Go to http://store.realestatebook.com to find yours.

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Home Office Design with Productivity in Mind

It’s a common piece of advice from effective home-based workers that you should start each day as if you were going to work in an office outside your home. (Translation: take a shower and don’t work in your pajamas.) The philosophy behind this tidbit is easy to understand.

The same axiom can apply to your home office. Is it tucked in a dark corner of the spare bedroom? Is your desk beside a bed covered in old toys? Is your filing cabinet stuffed in the closet under clothes? If your home office doesn’t feel professional and uplifting, how productive and happy can you be spending eight or more hours a day there?

Decorating your home office isn’t an art, but following some basic principles of office design can help create an organized, effective and productivity-enhancing space.

Choose a wall color that facilitates focus.

Even if your home office will be in the guest room that you just painted last year, it may be a good idea to repaint. Not only does a fresh coat of paint make a room feel energized and new, repainting gives you the opportunity to put a color on the wall that’s office-appropriate.

mydreamshavewings.blogspot.com

mydreamshavewings.blogspot.com

In an interview by Chris Bailey of the blog “A Life of Productivity,” color psychologist and author Angela Wright suggests that your home office color scheme needs to match the type of work you do because different colors create different effects. For example, Wright says, blue might be stimulating if you do a lot of mental work in your home office. Additionally, yellow could encourage creativity, and green might be soothing if your work is particularly stressful and balance is important.

Luxuriate in light.

“You are stuck in your office – albeit at home – all day, working and slaving away, staring at the same wall and some bland office furniture you got at a garage sale,” writes Herman Chan in Home Business Magazine. “Spending all those hours in the same spot, it would behoove you to splurge on one luxury piece.” Chan suggests an inspiring piece of furniture, but you can also create a luxe effect – with only a modest “splurge” – by decorating with lighting elements such as a skylight.

Add a solar-powered fresh air skylight and an energy-efficient solar-powered blind to your home office and the products, as well as the installation, can be eligible for a 30 percent federal tax credit as a green home improvement.

iloveblinds.com

iloveblinds.com

If your home office happens to be located in a renovated attic space, roof windows, which are very much like skylights but are in-reach, can offer natural light and fresh air plus access to the roof for debris removal, maintenance or for emergency access.

Organize with attractive storage.

If your idea of home office storage includes the cardboard boxes you used to transport files from the last job you had outside your home, it’s time to revisit your organizational plan. A cluttered, disorganized home office can cause you to misplace important documents and can make you feel overwhelmed.

As more people have begun working from home, office furniture manufacturers have branched out from the sterile-looking metal storage units ubiquitous in workplaces across the country. Today, it’s easy to find attractive storage options that fit with virtually any home office decor.

abowlfulloflemons.net

abowlfulloflemons.net

If you just can’t find a file cabinet that speaks to your soul, why not try some alternative storage options? Move that beautiful sideboard you inherited from grandma – that just never fit anywhere else in your house – into your home office and use it for filing. Not in love with any of the desk options available at your local office store? Hit an antique shop and find an antique desk or even a dining table that you adore. Remember to keep furnishings and storage solutions size-appropriate for the room so your home office doesn’t feel crowded.

Working from home offers many advantages, including the opportunity to decorate your home office the way you want. By following some basic steps and incorporating your own personality, you can create a home office where you’ll be productive and happy throughout the work day.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2015. All rights reserved.

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For Your Client: Do’s & Don’ts of Home Selling

moneycrashers.com

moneycrashers.com

First impressions are everything when it comes to selling a home.

“Most people make up their mind whether or not they like a house within mere minutes of stepping foot inside,” explains Don Frommeyer, mortgage expert and CEO of The National Association of Mortgage Brokers. “That is why it is crucial to make sure that you (and your home) are putting your best foot forward.”

Here are the top Do’s and Don’ts for getting your home ready for the market:

Don’t overdo it on the heat.

“People tend to overcompensate when they know that potential buyers are coming to look at their home in the winter time. They crank up the heat to make the place warm and welcoming,” says Frommeyer. “But that can backfire. The air will be dry and stale, plus the buyers will probably be too warm as they will be bundled up in coats. So keep the heat at a reasonable setting and have your humidifier set between 40-60 percent.”

Do consider curb appeal.

“Curb appeal is a huge draw for buyers, even in February,” says Frommeyer, “If you live in a cold state, consider creating a winter planter with cold-weather plants like winter berry holly or noble fir. At the very least, invest in a new doormat and keep the driveway clear of ice and snow. Warm lights glowing in the window will also be welcoming.”

Don’t expect people to use their imagination.

“If you have a crazy color choice in one (or more) of your rooms, you might think that people will look past that,” says Frommeyer. “But that can prove difficult for buyers. Garish paint and wacky décor choices will make them uneasy, no matter how beautiful your home is underneath your collection of animal heads. Paint over those wild colors and put away any crazy items that might garner a laugh or a raised brow.”

Do invest in updates that matter.

“People will pay top-dollar for homes with updated kitchens and bathrooms. If you can make even the barest improvements to these rooms, you will see a huge return. Update the yellowing tile in the bathroom or invest in new cabinetry. At the very least, purchase new shower curtains, bath rugs, and the like.”

Do keep it bright.

“Open all the curtains,” says Frommeyer, “Turn on all the lights, even if it is the afternoon. Replace all dead light bulbs. Crack open doors to the pantry or laundry room so people won’t be afraid to peek inside. And tidy up in forgotten places like inside the fridge or oven…people will be looking in there, and if they see mold or burnt food, they will be very turned off.”

For more information, visit www.namb.org.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2015. All rights reserved.

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